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This is my summer of thighs. No, not my thighs, the ones I don't want to show in a bathing suit: I'm talking about chicken thighs. My freezer runneth over with packages of boneless, skinless chicken thighs. (Consider yourselves warned.) If you are reading this in the morning, you could be eating this for lunch or dinner. The grilled chicken requires a quick marinade, made from ingredients you probably always have in the pantry (and can buy at the regular grocery store). And once cooked, the chicken tastes good hot or cold, which makes it a great make-ahead dish for summer entertaining. If you don't have a grill, go ahead and cook this under the broiler. I love to serve the chicken sliced and wrapped... Read more →


Serial introduced me to podcasts. On one weekend drive to New York City, my husband Ted and I binge-listened to the entire first season. I wanted more. Debbie Millman's Design Matters podcast kept me hooked; I even watched a telecast of her podcast. I wanted more. Public television brought us Julia Child, and public radio brought us The Splendid Table, hosted by Lynn Rossetto Kasper, more than 20 years ago and still going strong. They also brought us Radiolab, one of my granddaughter's delightful addictions. I never listened to food podcasts very much until I met Janice and Liz, the Meal Makeover Moms, and discovered their great podcast. Now I enjoy listening to my friend Jane's This Week for Dinner, which features interviews with food... Read more →


When it comes to revisiting old recipes, things don't always work out the way I plan. A post from 2008 needed updating with new photographs -- easy enough -- but when it came time to make the recipe, I realized that this was another case of how my cooking style and tastes have changed. Perfect for the broiler or grill and ideal for Meatless Mondays (and vegan friends), this tofu and asparagus dish with a rich, salty hoisin and sesame sauce bears slight resemblance to the original. I've simplified the number of ingredients, and eliminated the noodles, which I seldom eat these days. The grill lends a slightly smoky taste to the tofu, which is lovely but not entirely necessary if, like me, you don't... Read more →


A creative cook needs only two methods of cooking leftovers, two master recipes that disguise those bits and pieces and presto-change-o them into something completely new and exciting. These days we might call them kitchen hacks, but these kitchen "tricks" been around forever: toss leftovers into a soup pot, or wrap them in eggs. Fold any leftovers into any basic soup or egg recipe, and you've got a reliably wonderful "new" dish to put on the table. And that is the genesis of this frittata. I started with a single slice of smoked salmon, and half an avocado. A large fennel bulb intended for something else gave up part of its outer stalk and a leafy frond, and added a bit of crunchy, anise undertone.... Read more →


In the house where I grew up, mustard was yellow, neon-bright yellow, and we squirted it on hot dogs. Period. In my own kitchen, I stock at least half a dozen types of mustard, but none gets used as often as Dijon mustard. It's tangy, yet not strident. A spoonful of Dijon goes into every spaghetti sauce I make; I know it sounds odd, but you have to trust me and try it. Dijon adds character. Mix a little bit of Dijon into your egg salad or potato salad. Add it to meatloaf. And don't forget vinaigrette dressings for your salads. Sometimes I use the country Dijon, made with coarsely-ground mustard seed; other times, I use the smooth mustard. Over the years I've written a... Read more →


It takes a village to make a plate of collard greens. Well, it took my village to make this plate of collards. Stephen, a regular user of our Little Free Library, loves to cook and has a large garden in the Fenway near the Museum of Fine Arts. Recently he brought me a wonderful gift of a huge bag of collards fresh from the garden. Believe it or not, I've never cooked collards, because I've never really loved them (too slimy, and usually made with ham hocks, which I don't eat). So I asked for recipe advice, and Stephen suggested the typical long cook time of 2-3 hours, with smoked turkey in place of the ham, or maybe smoked paprika. I knew I wouldn't like... Read more →


When we moved from the log house last year, we left behind our over-the-hill grill. Now that grilling season approaches, all I can think about is buying a new grill for our backyard, because dishes like this chicken bulgogi are calling to me. I pressed the broiler into service to make this recipe for you, because I'm sure I'm the only person who doesn't already have a grill cleaned and ready to go. The broiler made truly crisp-juicy chicken bulgogi, so I don't hesitate to recommend this method. Korean barbecue is all the rage, and for good reason. While the outside of the salty-sweet meat crisps over (or under) the fire, the inside remains tender, thanks to the addition of Asian pear or kiwi in... Read more →